William Joyce A Day With Wilbur Robinson Singapore

A Day With Wilbur Robinson by William Joyce (Hardback)

$24.90
- +
See more: Hardback

The book which inspired the animation film "Meet The Robinsons" by Disney

Come meet the Robinsons: Young Wilbur has a robot. Uncle Art has his own flying saucer. Cousin Laszlo has an antigravity device. The butler is an octopus.

It's snowing in the east wing. And somebody left the Time Machine on, so . . . Well, perhaps you'd care to read what happens next.

From William Joyce, creator of the Emmy-winning Rolie Polie Olie as well as author and illustrator of a stack of whimsy-based entertainments for children and like-minded adults.

*Despite our best efforts to predict the demand for books, the magical spells we use sometimes fail us. So to check if we have the book in-stock before you place your order, contact us at 6702 2452 or drop us an email at myimaginationkingdom@gmail.com

Reading Level: 4+

Reviews:

"We love William Joyce books at our house. This one and "Dinosaur Bob" are our favorites. This book is so cool - the narrator kid goes to spend the day at his friend William Robinson's house. The Robinsons are all super cool - Uncle Orbley has an anti-gravity machine, Grandpa conducts a frog swing band, and William's sister wears a prom dress shaped like a skyscraper with a hat that includes King Kong and airplanes.

I wish our lives looked like William Joyce's illustrations. If I had to pick which literary world to inhabit, Joyce's is in my top three. (What? Like you've never wished you were a Gryffindor. Or a Bennett. Or whoever.)"

"The inside jacket says "Ages 4 - reasonably ancient," so I didn't have to guess on an age range for this one. Thanks, Harper Collins! This very silly book is a great intro to crazy sci-fi for kids. The narrator goes over to Wilbur's house for a visit, and while Wilbur is bored out of his mind, his wacky family of absurdist scientists is creating novel and ridiculous things and scenarios. This book is for kids who are prompted to giggle incessantly by any sort of non-sensical mayhem. There are a lot of 1940s-looking illustrations and not too much text."

Click here to read the original reviews

Scroll to top